NO NEW STADIUM

January 24, 2019

Edgewood has had many fine projects, but stadium is not among them

Shawn Schey | Cap Times

Dear Editor: I have lived across from the Edgewood campus for 34 years, and served on the Edgewood-Neighborhood Liaison Committee more than half of those. Since 1995, the neighborhood has said yes to Edgewood’s Sonderegger Science Center, a parking ramp structure, and the Predolin Humanities Center. We have said yes to the Mazzuchelli Biological Station, the Dominican Dorm, an addition to the Campus School, a visual and theatre arts center, and a dorm addition to Regina Hall. We have said yes to parking lot expansions, the high school’s expansion of their commons, and their current fine arts addition, now underway. We have said “Yes-in-my-front-yard” for over 24 years to one project after another.

But the latest stadium proposal is the first project that does not have my support because of how it would irretrievably alter the neighborhood far beyond Edgewood’s own campus. There are no technological “fixes” for the noise a stadium generates, or the lighting that is necessary for chasing a ball in the dark. Sound study consultants are telling us that decibel levels would be as high as 70-85 dBA just from the cheering of a crowd and a referee's whistle, making a conversation in one’s own living room inaudible if a window were open. But what if there’s canned music, or the crowd is bigger than 350? How loud is “loud” going to be?

In the past, Edgewood has sought to co-exist with their neighbors, coming up with good building projects over the years. A new stadium on their campus is not one of them.


 

January 24, 2019

Edgewood isn't honoring its values

Pat Alea | Wisconsin State Journal

I am on the steering committee of No New Stadium. I'm a 36-year resident of the Dudgeon-Monroe neighborhood on Madison's Near West Side. My daughters attended Edgewood Campus School, Middle School and High School.

My sad realization is that the current Edgewood administration is a far cry from the leadership of the past. The suggestion that Dominican values are being upheld is not true.

Truth has been compromised in Edgewood’s misrepresentations of need, intent and project scope. Compassion is absent in a revenue-producing project that results in lost property values for nearest neighbors. There is little justice when leaders and students live elsewhere, and our neighborhood must deliver the goods. Where is the partnership when our very self-respect is called NIMBY?

Imagine if Edgewood had called our community together and said, “We’re in a bit of trouble. Enrollment is down. Revenues are tight. We have a history of such great collaborations. Let’s work together to help Edgewood thrive!” Our neighborhood would have risen to an honest challenge because we don’t want Edgewood to fail.

Instead, the current administration has presented a convoluted plan excluding true input. A long history of trust and cooperation has been sacrificed.


 
 

January 28, 2019

Legistar Data shows residents near Edgewood oppose stadium 3 to 1

PRESS RELEASE

For Immediate Release
Date: 1/28/2019
Press Contact: Catherine Jagoe
Phone: 608-620-5850
Email: nonewstadiuminfo@gmail.com

 MADISON, WI. (January 24, 2019) -- Analysis of emails sent to the City of Madison between September 6, 2018 and January 8, 2019 show that neighborhoods surrounding Edgewood High School oppose the construction of a new stadium on the Edgewood campus 3 to 1. The Plan Department posted the emails online on the City of Madison Legislative Information Center, File #53954.

 Citizens’ names, locations (nearby vs. no address/outside Madison/out of state) and whether they were for or against the stadium were tracked, as were duplicate emails from the same individuals.

 Residents of the three neighborhoods (Dudgeon-Monroe, Vilas, and Regent) closest to Edgewood’s campus oppose the stadium 3 to 1. The most common reason cited for opposition to the stadium was incompatible land use. 158 people signed an initial letter of opposition to the Plan Commission on October 31, 2018. The Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association voted 18-to-1 in firm opposition.

 Those who expressed support for the stadium claimed that Edgewood as an institution contributes greatly to the community and should be able to offer this to their students. Numerous emails stated that EHS students “deserve” and have “earned the right” to a stadium. According to publicly available emails, Edgewood High School asked their entire past and present school community to write the Alder and City of Madison Plan Commission in support of the stadium.

 The breakdown of the analysis appears below. 

*No Address Provided or None of the Above

*No Address Provided or None of the Above

 

About No New Stadium

No New Stadium is a grassroots organization of neighbors who oppose Edgewood High School’s proposal to build an outdoor stadium with lights and amplified sound on its Monroe Street campus. The group was formed in October 2018. Learn more at nonewstadium.org.

###

 
 

January 23, 2019

No New Stadium Statement

on Edgewood High School’s Alterations to Proposed Master Plan Amendment

PRESS RELEASE

For Immediate Release
Date: 1/28/2019
Press Contact: Catherine Jagoe
Phone: 608-620-5850
Email: nonewstadiuminfo@gmail.com

 MADISON, WI. (January 23, 2019) -- In response to Edgewood High School’s January 9 announcement that it will alter its proposal to build a new $1 million, 1,000-seat stadium with lights and amplified sound, neighborhood group No New Stadium has issued the following statement:

 We appreciate that Edgewood High School has admitted that stadium noise impacts can’t be mitigated, and has asked for a delay in consideration by the Plan Commission.

 In an interview with Wisconsin State Journal reporter Dean Mosiman on January 9, Edgewood High School president Mike Elliott proposed alterations to EHS’s proposed Master Plan amendment to build the new stadium: reducing the 40 proposed night football games a year to 25 (none are currently permitted); ending football games by 10pm and other competitive sports events by 8:30pm; and building a noise barrier or wall on three sides of the stadium.

No New Stadium continues to oppose the Master Plan amendment because it would negatively impact livability for nearby residents and undermine urban greenspace in the neighboring Park and Pleasure Drive, Wingra Park, Vilas Park and on Lake Wingra:

  • EHS’ sound study by Professional Audio Designs of Wauwatosa, issued January 4, 2019, “contains a number of technical and legal errors, omissions, and misstatements, which invalidate much of its analysis and conclusions,” according to electrical engineer Ethan Brodsky. He notes that “Edgewood’s consultant has acknowledged, through this report, that a stadium would generate sound levels on neighboring properties that would exceed the city’s legal limit of 65 dB.” Their own consultants’ model shows a 70 dBA contour running along front-line homes on Monroe Street for a game with 150 spectators and no wall. Overall, Brodsky believes that the report “substantially underestimates stadium noise levels.”

  • EHS’ sound study underestimates the height of the barrier needed to mitigate stadium noise and overestimates the noise reduction it would achieve. Guidelines for noise barriers show that for effective noise remediation, any wall would have to block the direct line of sight from the grandstand to nearby homes. For houses along Monroe St, this would require a wall approximately 35-40 feet tall, not the 16-26 feet that EHS suggests. “Even supposing a 10 dB reduction in noise level from an adequately-sized noise barrier, stadium noise would still be substantially in excess of city regulations over a large area,” says Brodsky.

  •  EHS also filed an Environmental Impact Assessment, dated January 10, 2019, which serves as a defense of, rather than guidance for, the proposed stadium and its design. Jim Lorman, Edgewood College Professor Emeritus, who has reviewed the EIA, says it is “largely a boilerplate review of issues (e.g., potential toxins) irrelevant to the specific concerns the public has raised about the proposal.” He documents problems throughout the report, noting particularly that it is “lacking adequate background and impact analysis on nearby areas that will be affected by the proposed project, including the local neighborhood (number and proximity of residents, etc.), the Edgewood Park and Pleasure Drive, and Lake Wingra.” Dr. Lorman says that the EIA is “incomplete and inadequate” and that “much of its analysis is subjective, unwarranted by existing data, misleading, and/or simply inaccurate.”

  • Documents released by the Middleton-Cross Plains School District reveal that, contrary to Edgewood’s claims that they could not continue playing their games at Middleton High School, they enjoyed preferential scheduling and terminated the agreement voluntarily. They could still play at Middleton.

  • Edgewood has violated the terms of the Master Plan and thus city zoning law by hosting numerous daytime and evening competitions for multiple sports on their field, after they committed to hold only phys ed classes and practices there. Many of these non-conforming events have generated noise levels on neighboring properties that exceed the limit set by city noise ordinance.

  • EHS committed to expand field use to a wide number of non-EHS groups in their June 2015 agreement with the Goodman Foundation, without consulting the neighborhood associations or including this in the Master Plan negotiations. Furthermore, they did not disclose that such events were occurring, and made statements in local media implying the opposite.

About No New Stadium

No New Stadium is a grassroots organization of neighbors who oppose Edgewood High School’s proposal to build an outdoor stadium with lights and amplified sound on its Monroe Street campus. The group was formed in October 2018. Learn more at nonewstadium.org.

###


 

January 20, 2019

Stadiums pummel neighbors with noise

John Robinson | Wisconsin State Journal

The neighbors of Edgewood who want the stadium should take a listen to the Madison Mallards on game night.

I can listen to the stadium’s sound system half a mile away, standing in my backyard. The homes on Trailsway, North Sherman Avenue and Northport Drive that are immediately surrounding the stadium are pummeled by noise, which surely must be in violation of city ordinances. And now the Mallards baseball stadium is scheduling concerts in addition to baseball.

When will additional “amplified entertainment” happen at the stadium at Edgewood? Oh, they will say it will not happen. But next year, or the following year, a “one-time event” will be scheduled, and incrementally more events, and more noise.

It’s coming soon to your neighborhood. Or not, if good sense prevails.


January 13, 2019

Edgewood shouldn't invest in football

Andrew Ladd, Madison | Wisconsin State Journal

In all of the discussion about Edgewood High School's proposal for a new stadium, one elephant in the room has been overlooked. Why should any significant investment be made in a sport known to inflict long-term brain damage in players?

While the facility will be multi-sport, obviously football is the primary financial driver. The stadium will help Edgewood better compete for area students in a time of increasingly challenging enrollments. But well-established research shows football poses significant health risks that go beyond concussions to the repeated (and unavoidable) blows to the head.

To put this in context: Throw on a helmet and hit your head up against a wall for eight weeks straight. Then imagine a brain still in its development.

I say this as a parent of a former Edgewood student who received an excellent education. I say this as a former football player and once-avid fan: I cannot in good conscience support youth football knowing now the terrible risks.

Twenty years from now, football stadiums such as these will be a negative symbol of an era not yet ready to quit an unhealthy addiction. I would counsel Edgewood to commit its resources to finding a worthier emblem of its academic excellence.


 

January 9, 2019

West side neighborhood group accuses Edgewood of misleading public over stadium needs

Lisa Speckhard Pasque, Cap Times

Many neighbors have long opposed Edgewood High School’s contentious proposal to build a stadium with lights, seats and amplified sound.

Now grassroots resident group No New Stadium is publicizing the results of an open records request which they say shows a “pattern of deception” and “bad faith negotiating tactics.”

Chief among their complaints: Edgewood has said using the Middleton High School field is “no longer feasible,” and No New Stadium takes issue with that characterization, saying records show Edgewood could have continued to use the field.

Email obtained via open records.

Email obtained via open records.

“We did not have problems with them, actually it was a good arrangement. They are just wanting to get lights at their new stadium and the neighborhood doesn’t want that,” an October email from Middleton High School Athletic Director Bob Joers reads.

Edgewood wants to replace 450 bleacher seats on its athletic field with a 1,000-seat stadium including restrooms, a press box and a concession area. The school plans to install LED lighting that would minimize “glare, light spill and sky glow” and a sound system that would direct noise into the stadium. 

Edgewood must amend its master plan to go through with the project. The amendment was originally slated to appear before the Madison Plan Commission on Jan. 14 and the City Council on Jan. 22., but on Wednesday, Edgewood requested that the project be referred to a later date.  

Many neighbors are adamantly opposed to the idea, which they say will disrupt the neighborhood. The Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association strongly opposes the proposal; the Vilas Neighborhood has voiced support for the project.

Without a stadium, Edgewood's athletics teams rotate their "home" games at several available fields including Middleton High School’s Breitenbach Stadium. Edgewood’s website and November project proposal said the agreement with Middleton was “no longer feasible.”

“This is due not only to Middleton’s own athletic program demands, but financial ramifications, safety concerns and scheduling for Edgewood’s athletes. This fact has left Edgewood scrambling to find a location for ‘home’ games,” the proposal reads.

A September letter to the city from Vandewalle & Associates on behalf of Edgewood said “prior agreements for use of Middleton’s field cannot be extended, leaving Edgewood without predictable locations and often last on the list of requests to host games.”

“Edgewood has created this crisis, portraying their quest for a stadium as an absolute need when it’s simply something they want,” said Tag Evers, a spokesman for No New Stadium and a candidate for City Council.

In a Tuesday Wisconsin State Journal article, Joers and Edgewood President Mike Elliott clarified that while Edgewood had the option to keep using the Middleton field, scheduling was becoming more difficult with Middleton’s increasing field use.

No New Stadium is also accusing Edgewood of misrepresenting or omitting data on a score of other issues, including:

  • In an Oct. 26 email Elliott, city zoning administrator Matt Tucker writes that he believes the current filed usage “is operating outside of the allowances of the adopted Master Plan.” After a response from Edgewood disputing this, Tucker followed up with another message saying that if Edgewood’s application for a major alteration to their Master Plan is denied, “the City will send a formal notice of violation.”

  • In a July email to former Ald. Sara Eskrich, Elliott wrote: “I am in a heap of trouble with no place to play an Oct 5 game that is senior night. Parents want to hold game here with temporary lights and seats. Cost to do that is $27,000. Can you help me understand time involved for us to get seats and lights? Now that your [sic] leaving how about a sign off for a minor amendment????”

This week, Edgewood proposed a compromise, some of which had previously discussed publicly, ahead of next Monday’s Plan Commission meeting. It would set a limit of 17 games ending by 8:30 p.m. and eight Friday night games ending by 10 p.m. It would further add a wall or berm at the end of the track to lower crowd noise and add visual screening, and clean up Master Plan language to explicitly allow for the field’s current uses.

No New Stadium was unimpressed with these changes, saying in a press release that the wall would not do enough to reduce noise.

“Unfortunately, what Edgewood needs is more land to accommodate their desired expansion and intensified use,” the release said.

On Wednesday, the DMNA asked Edgewood to delay the project's appearance before the Plan Commission, which Edgewood did Wednesday afternoon.

"In just the last few days, Edgewood has released a new sound study, a new environmental impact study, and a new proposal to add a sound wall to their proposed field improvements," a statement from Rachel Fields, vice president of the neighborhood association, said. "All of these were released after the public comment for the Plan Commission meeting had already ended. Simply for the sake of enabling our members to know what proposals are even being considered by the City, we called on Edgewood to ask for a postponement."

Elliott was contacted for comment, and this story will be updated with any response. 

This story has been updated, as the project will no longer appear before the Plan Commission on Jan. 14. 


 

January 9, 2019

Press release

Documents Raise Questions About Edgewood High School’s Honesty in Push for New Stadium

MADISON, WI. (January 9, 2019) -- Emails obtained via Open Records Requests reveal a pattern of bad-faith negotiating tactics and misinformation on the part of Edgewood High School with regard to its proposed Master Plan amendment. The proposed amendment, which will be reviewed by the City of Madison Plan Commission on January 14, would allow the private Catholic high school to build a 1,000-person stadium with 80-foot tall light poles and amplified sound less than 100 feet away from the nearest private residence.

Open Records Requests have yielded numerous documents related to aspects of Edgewood High School’s proposal for a new stadium. Public-facing, open source information has also shed light on EHS’s proposal.

All emails obtained via Open Records Request.

All emails obtained via Open Records Request.

Vils_Middleton.PNG

Ten key pieces of information have been revealed:

  1. Want vs. Need: Edgewood High School clearly wants a home stadium and argue they need a stadium by asserting it is no longer feasible for them to play their home schedule on Middleton’s field. This appears to be false. In emails obtained via Open Records Requests, Middleton officials indicate that EHS is welcome to continue the arrangement they had with Middleton.

  2. Crowd Noise Impacts: EHS’s second claim in support of a new stadium is that “technological improvements” will minimize the impacts of stadium sound, when there is no way to mitigate crowd noise. EHS included a discussion of crowd noise in their 10/17/18 public neighborhood presentation but then left it out of their proposal to the city to amend the Master Plan. Their proposal includes seven pages on lights but nothing on crowd noise, probably because Edgewood knows crowd noise will likely exceed allowable decibel levels in the city’s noise ordinance.

  3. Sound Data: EHS has estimated the impact of stadium sound in terms of average dB levels, which is not the industry standard. In a 1/2/19 letter to Mayor Paul Soglin, sound engineer Michael Oliva wrote, “Citing average sound levels, rather than peaks, is a completely unprofessional and misleading conduct in Edgewood’s description of the stadium’s impact.”

  4. Goodman Negotiations: It appears that Edgewood High School signed an agreement with the Goodman Foundation that stated the athletic field would be used by numerous outside groups, without receiving City and neighborhood association approval.

  5. Violations of Master Plan: Edgewood has been holding games and competitive sports events on the practice field, in non-compliance with the Master Plan, which is documented in EHS’ 2016-17 and 2017-18 reports to the Goodman Foundation. As a consequence, EHS has run afoul of the city, as attested by City of Madison Zoning Administrator Matt Tucker’s email to EHS after their 10/17/18 public, Foley & Lardner’s response, and the city's response indicating its disagreement with F & L's position.

  6. Intentions for Field: In June 2015, Edgewood High School claimed that they were upgrading the field for practices and Phys Ed classes only. However, a 6/15/15 WSJ article entitled “Edgewood breaking ground on $1.5 million athletic practice facility” quoted EHS Mike Elliott saying, “‘We’re between two neighborhood associations. They have been vehemently opposed to us having lights or playing games here,’ he said. ‘We’re really building this to be able to give our athletes the practice facilities that provide the best surfaces possible and to expand the amount of outdoor practices we can hold especially in the spring. That is our focal point.’” At the same time, Elliot was negotiating with Goodman for a gift that would require the field be used for games and community events.

  7. Number of Events: Edgewood has provided misleading and unclear information in their communications to the public, not acknowledging that they plan to host any number of daytime games and events with amplified sound, plus lighted practices until 7p.m. on a consistent basis. They have not been clear about the actual number of events they plan to host in their proposed stadium.

  8. Misrepresenting their dealings with the neighborhoods: The publicity items Edgewood has been sending out regarding the stadium give the impression that Edgewood always works with the neighborhood in their decisions, but at both the neighborhood information sessions in 2017 and 2018, the overwhelming majority of neighborhood speakers opposed a stadium. Despite this, EHS has largely ignored neighborhood concerns. Attempts to reach out to Mike Elliott by Rachel Fields, Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association Vice-President, have gone unanswered.

  9. Misrepresenting WIAA Rules: EHS cites WIAA regulations that Friday night games with lights are obligatory, but they are merely customary. EHS also claimed in the public meeting that WIAA mandates 1,200 seats for a stadium but then downgraded the number to 1,000. WIAA in fact only requires 1,000 seats for playoff games. Edgewood is under no obligation to build a stadium with 1,000 seats or to have lights.

  10. Inappropriately Trying to Influence Alder Sara Eskrich: Claiming he was “in a heap of trouble” from parents because the school had not yet scheduled a home game for Senior Night on October 5, on Thursday, July 26, 2018, Edgewood High School President Mike Elliott asked former District 13 Alder Sara Eskrich to help get City approval to host a football game on the existing athletic field, with “temporary lights and sound” and sign off on a minor amendment. Eskrich responded on July 27, “I cannot sign-off on the stadium lights as a minor alteration because we’ve discussed, very publicly, that this requires a master plan amendment.” Elliott made this request after learning of neighborhood opposition to the stadium, knowing that this was not permitted by the Master Plan.


Press release | January 3, 2019

Emails Reveal Evidence of Edgewood High School’s Dishonesty on Stadium

Documents

Emails between Edgwewood High School and Middleton High School | View PDF

Email to the city from Brian Munson of Vandewalle & Associates, the PR firm hired by Edgewood to advance the stadium proposal | View PDF


MADISON, WI. (January 3, 2019) -- Emails obtained via open records requests reveal a pattern of deception by Edgewood High School regarding its proposal to build a new stadium with lights and amplified sound in the residential neighborhood adjacent to Lake Wingra.

The emails from Middleton-Cross Plains Area School District officials reveal that Edgewood High School’s frequently repeated claim to the public and the city that it needs to build a stadium because it lost its agreement to continue renting Middleton High School’s football field is false.

On October 29, 2018, when asked why Edgewood was no longer using the Middleton stadium and whether the contract could be renewed, Middleton High School Athletic Director Bob Joers responded: “We did not have problems with them, actually it was a good arrangement. They are just wanting to get lights at their new stadium and the neighborhood doesn’t want that.”

All emails obtained via Open Records Request.

All emails obtained via Open Records Request.

Joers_Middleton.png

Joers added Edgewood High School had asked him to respond to queries by saying, “Our agreement with Edgewood ended Spring of 2017.”

“Edgewood has always been WONDERFUL to work with,” stated Facilities Program Coordinator Yvonne Vils in an October 30, 2018 email response to Joers and Director of Business Services Lori Ames. “It was their choice to go elsewhere.”

The emails show that Edgewood High School could have continued to play their home games in Middleton, contrary to its claim to the city that “Prior agreements for use of Middleton’s field cannot be extended, leaving Edgewood without predictable locations and often last on the list of requests to host games.” (Sept. 13, 2018 email to the city from Brian Munson of Vandewalle & Associates, the PR firm hired by Edgewood to advance the stadium proposal).

“Many of those who attended Edgewood High School’s public meeting this fall came away with the impression that Edgewood needs a stadium because they ‘lost’ their agreement with Middleton,” says Dudgeon-Monroe neighbor Dianne Jenkins.

Alder Allen Arntsen is among those who came away with that impression. Arntsen wrote in a statement on December 11 that “Edgewood requests this amendment [to its master plan] because it is losing its right to play home games in Middleton.”

Edgewood did not lose its right to play home games in Middleton but rather declined to continue doing so of its own accord.

“These latest revelations compound a pattern of dishonesty in Edgewood High School’s dealings with the neighborhood,” says Tag Evers, Dudgeon-Monroe resident and District 13 aldermanic candidate.

This has created a huge credibility problem among neighbors, including Dudgeon-Monroe resident Jamie Domini.

“The proposed amendment makes several promises — lights that don’t bleed, sound that is contained, a specified number of events — but Edgewood has not honored past agreements, has not fully disclosed pertinent information, and has not engaged the neighborhood in good faith,” Domini says. “Based on this pattern of behavior, it’s safe to assume that Edgewood won’t honor the new promises they’re making.”

About No New Stadium
No New Stadium is a grassroots organization of neighbors who oppose Edgewood High School’s proposal to build a stadium with lights and amplified sound on its Monroe Street campus. The group was formed in October 2018. The Monroe-Vilas area provides a model balance of commercial vibrancy, greenspace, and peace. This balance is an asset we wish to defend and preserve. Learn more at nonewstadium.org.


 

December 26, 2018

Neighborhood loses in Edgewood stadium proposal

Tracy Lewis, Cap Times

Dear Editor: I am writing in reference to the article "Explained: Compromise proves difficult in Edgewood High School stadium standoff." I am a 30-year resident of the Edgewood neighborhood and own a business on Regent Street. I have a strong commitment to helping ensure that this truly wonderful community continues to thrive.

Change is inevitable and we are already seeing it on Monroe Street with new multiuse buildings and businesses coming in. This will enrich livability and add to what is already a very vibrant part of the city.

What distresses me is Edgewood High School's persistence in trying to make a change that will largely benefit people outside the immediate area while negatively impacting those right here. We live in a society where we value the right to do as you wish within the confines of one’s own property, but we also have a collective agreement that this right does not trump the responsibility to do no harm to one’s neighbor in the process.

The thought of nonstop amplified sound and crowd noise that will not be able to be moderated terrifies me. We will be subjected to this on an almost-continuous basis. Games being played not only by EHS teams but various other outside entities three seasons of the year will mean constant disruption.

Edgewood has asked for our support and understanding, but where is their regard for us?

Trying to reach a “compromise” is absurd. What a compromise will mean is one foot in the door leading to what Edgewood really wants: full rein to do as they wish. Build it and they will come — and what will be lost to the neighborhood character and those of us with homes within yards of this stadium will never be recovered.


December 23, 2018

Edgewood needs money from stadium

Dianne Jenkins, Wisconsin State Journal.

The State Journal editorial board stepped into the Edgewood High School stadium debate Wednesday, framing the issue as “Let the kids play under the lights.” But the editorial missed the broader story.

Yes, it is about the kids. But it is also about the money, particularly Edgewood High School’s need for new revenue streams, and it’s about protecting the livability of a city neighborhood.

According to a UW-Madison Applied Population Laboratory report, the number of Wisconsin high school graduates has plateaued, which is bad news for private schools that compete for students. In 2009, the number of Wisconsin high school graduates peaked at about 70,140, declined 7.6 percent to 64,803 in 2016, and will not increase until 2026, to 67,000.

The impact on private school enrollment of this population decline and plateau is obvious at Edgewood High School. In the 2014 Campus Master Plan, Edgewood High School reported 593 students in 2012 and projected 650 students by 2022. Instead, its enrollment has declined, to 487 in 2017. At a stated tuition of $11,345, the 18 percent decline in enrollment represents an annual $1.2 million budget shortfall needed to pay operating expenses.

One new source of revenue was achieved in 2015 when the Goodman Foundation generously donated just over $1 million to build a new “sports complex” for the high school, with a requirement that it also serve the community. To the neighborhood’s increasing concern, the high school reported 22 unaffiliated groups used the sports complex in 2016-2017, and 21 in 2017-2018.

But the high school’s approved use for the sports complex, codified in the Campus Master Plan, is to host team practices and physical education classes, not competitions. The high school has violated its master plan agreement by hosting youth soccer, lacrosse and private grade school games, as well as UW teams and others.

So the issue is not just crowd noise and accompanying eight-story lights for a handful of night games. The high school will want to expand the use of a sports complex for the badly needed rental income, and to fulfill its community use agreement with the Goodman Foundation.

Edgewood High School has placed itself between a rock and a hard place. It agreed with Goodman to increase field use, while overlooking its responsibility to first obtain approval for such use.

If this use is approved, the economic odds are in favor of Edgewood expanding further, whatever the conditions. This sentiment is felt throughout the neighborhood as exhibited by the Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association’s 18-to-1 vote in opposition and subsequent opposition to the City Council member’s proposal.

Unlike the previous 16 campus projects it supported, our neighborhood association opposes this one because people living across the street in the neighborhood, on two sides of the proposed sports complex, will bear all the negative impacts of such use.

And there goes the neighborhood.

Jenkins is a Dudgeon-Monroe neighborhood resident on Madison’s Near West Side and a member of No New Stadium, a group of neighbors and others who oppose the Edgewood High School stadium proposal: nonewstadium.org.


 

December 21, 2018

Current Edgewood stadium is already a compromise

Susan Nicol, Cap Times

Dear Editor: Continually lost in the current argument over the proposed addition to the Edgewood stadium is that the current state WAS the compromise. Ten years ago the neighborhood and Edgewood conflicted over stadium development. The compromise reached was that Edgewood would be allowed to upgrade and improve this arena with resurfacing, and stands added, but that they would NEVER add sound system or lights.

The neighbors have accepted the additional noise, traffic and trash that the current stadium brought. In secret, Edgewood added preparations for sound system and lights, revealing that the compromise of the time was just a stepping stone to new demands. Now Edgewood is pushing again, tone deaf to the neighbors who have opted out of offering this for their own children at the nearby public school due to a desire to remain considerate to neighbors of West High. Edgewood is acting like an entitled child, unappreciative of the gifts already given and demanding MORE, MORE!

I don’t live across the street from Edgewood, but I have empathy for those who do. You have my support. No new stadium. Players should have their large games in an appropriate location. It’s what other schools do when that close to a neighborhood. If this new “compromise” were to be approved, no doubt in a few years we would be hearing a demand for more. It’s not really a compromise. It’s this year’s demand.


 
 

News release


 

For Immediate Release
Date: 12/13/2018
Contact: Catherine Jagoe
Phone: 608-620-5850
Email: nonewstadiuminfo@gmail.com

No New Stadium Grassroots Neighborhood Group Responds to Alder Allen Arntsen’s Statement on Edgewood High School’s Proposed Amendment to Master Plan

Edgewood Neighbors Acknowledge Alder’s Statement; Remain Opposed

MADISON, WI. (December 13, 2018) -- In response to Interim District 13 Alder Allen Arntsen’s short-term, five-game solution to Edgewood High School’s proposal to amend its Master Plan and build a 1,000-person stadium with lights and sound, neighbors warn that building a new stadium still poses a serious long-term threat to livability and urban greenspace. Grassroots neighborhood group No New Stadium remains opposed to Edgewood High School’s proposed amendment to its Master Plan to allow for the construction of the new stadium.

“The Edgewood campus had 144 bird species either resident or migrating through in 2018,” says neighbor Catherine Jagoe, an avid walker, cyclist, and birdwatcher. “Lake Wingra is the quietest of Madison’s lakes, thanks to staunch neighborhood efforts to make it a refuge for paddlers, cyclists, anglers, runners, birdwatchers and local children. A stadium with lights, sound, increased noise and increased traffic in the neighborhood--since the majority of Edgewood families come from outside the neighborhood and even the city--will have a negative impact on precious urban greenspace, which we have to protect.”

In publicity materials and news interviews, Edgewood High School has claimed that the impact of its proposed Monroe Street stadium would be minimal, since there is a technological fix to the sound and light problems, but nearby neighbors already experience high levels of noise from the existing new field inside their homes, with the windows closed. Since there are no city ordinances that relate to crowd noise, any complaints of violations are unenforceable.

“Alder Arntsen’s suggestion to allow Edgewood High School to build a new stadium but limit the use of lights to a total of five events per year for the next six years only deals with future nighttime events,” explains neighbor Tracy Lewis. “It does not address the current unacceptable levels of noise from daytime use of the track and field, which would worsen considerably with sound amplification.”

The neighborhood has long been overwhelmingly opposed to a stadium on Edgewood’s Monroe Street campus. The existing state-of-the-art athletic field, which was built in 2015, is the result of a 2014 compromise between the Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association and Edgewood High School. Nevertheless, during the past two years, Edgewood High School has allowed games and competitive events to be held on the field, in violation of its current master plan.

“Edgewood High School has eroded neighborhood trust by breaking its clear commitment to use its field for practice and physical education classes only,” says neighbor Dianne Jenkins. “Once a stadium is built, it can’t be unbuilt, and neighbors justifiably fear incremental expansion of use and growing sound, light and traffic impact, to the detriment of homeowners and the Lake Wingra environment.”

The Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association strongly opposes the proposed new stadium. “Since 2001, DMNA has supported 16 development projects for the high school, college and primary school,” DMNA wrote in its statement of opposition. “Unlike usual city development that creates infill, prevents urban sprawl and increases the city tax base, this amendment benefits a private institution with nearly half its student population outside the Madison city limits, without adding significant benefit to the city as a whole.”

“I believe Edgewood High School has a financial incentive to use the stadium as a revenue generator at the expense of its neighbors,” says neighbor Pat Alea. “If this is approved for a nominal number of games, expect to see new proposals from Edgewood High School to expand on usage for its private income. That doesn’t do much for neighborhood families, the majority of whom send their kids to public schools, like West High, which doesn’t have a stadium.”

About No New Stadium
No New Stadium is a grassroots organization of neighbors who oppose Edgewood High School’s proposal to build a stadium with lights and amplified sound on its Monroe Street campus. The group was formed in October 2018. The Monroe-Vilas area provides a model balance of commercial vibrancy, greenspace and peace. This balance is an asset we wish to defend and preserve. Learn more at nonewstadium.org.

###

 

 

 

 

 

November 28, 2018

The neighborhood responds to Edgewood stadium plan

Molly Stentz | A Public Affair

Listen as WORT news director Molly Stentz takes a close look at Edgewood High School's proposed Goodman Athletic Complex project. She is joined in the studio by Josh Napravnik from the Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood Association, which recently issued a letter declaring their opposition to the project. Madison residents weigh in on how the new stadium—and similar development projects throughout the city—could affect the broader community.


 
 

Letter to the Plan Commission

This letter was submitted to the City of Madison Plan Commission on October 31, 2018.


 
 

From: No New Stadium

To:
Ken Opin, Chair
Plan Commission
City of Madison

 cc:
Heather Stouder, Director
City of Madison Planning Division

 October 31, 2018

Dear Chairman Opin:

 We are a grassroots group of concerned citizens that formed after the public meeting held at Edgewood High School on October 17, 2018. We strongly oppose Edgewood’s recently unveiled plan to turn its new athletic field into a stadium with 1,200 seats, 80-foot high-mount night lighting and an amplified sound system. We respectfully request that you circulate this letter to the members of the Plan Commission prior to the November 5, 2018 meeting.

 Under the existing Campus Master Plan, approved in 2015, Edgewood built a $1.5 million outdoor athletic field. At that time, the neighborhood was led to believe the field would be used for practices only, and would not include lights or a sound system. Edgewood High School president Mike Elliott declared in the Wisconsin State Journal (6/15/2015), that neighborhood associations have been “opposed to us having lights or playing games here. We’re … building this to be able to give our athletes the practice facilities that provide the best surfaces possible.”

 Three years later, Edgewood has changed course and now plans to add a stadium to the practice field. They propose to host night events for football, soccer, lacrosse, track and field, and numerous other unlit sporting events during the day and early evening that would use amplified sound. This is a significant change in use of a significant part of their campus, which will have a significant impact on the neighborhood.

 A Dudgeon Monroe Neighborhood Association survey in April 2017 showed two-thirds of respondents were opposed. Recently, David Hoffert, president of DMNA, stated that since the 2017 survey, “the rough breakdown of two-thirds opposed and one-third in support has [not] significantly changed” (Capital Times, 10/16/18).

 Edgewood claims that neighbors would be largely unaffected because it has a technological fix for the livability problems of bright lights and noise pollution. We believe these claims are unproven. For example, data gathered by Ethan Brodsky, a Dudgeon-Monroe resident who has a PhD in Electrical & Computer Engineering, at a Waunakee High School football game, call into question the low decibel figures and mitigated light-spill claimed by Edgewood’s vendor. However good the technology, if this stadium is built, there will be additional noise, light and traffic, and increased use over time.

The Campus Institutional Zoning District ordinance Statement of Purpose (sec. 28.097 (1)(c), MGO), says that Campus Master Plans should “balance the ability of major institutions to change … with the need to protect the livability and vitality of adjacent neighborhoods.” There are two criteria listed in the CI Zoning Standards for Master Plan Approval by the Common Council (sec. 29.097 (6)(a) & (b), MGO). The first is that “the Plan shall serve the public interest as well as the interest of the institution developing the plan.” The public interest in reasonable peace and quiet currently cherished by nearby residents would not be served by a continuous series of events punctuated by a play-by-play announcer, pep bands, and crowd noise. This would profoundly change the neighborhood’s essential fabric as a quiet, friendly residential community. The impact to the adjacent neighborhoods will be decidedly negative, with spillover effects on recreational use of Lake Wingra, traffic issues on Monroe Street and neighboring streets, and a tragic breach in relations between Edgewood and its neighbors.

The second CI zoning criterion is “the Plan shall be consistent with the goals of the Comprehensive Plan and adopted neighborhood, corridor or special area plans adjacent to campus boundaries.” The Edgewood proposal is inconsistent with the Monroe Street Commercial District Plan, adopted by the City on March 3, 2007. One of the stated Commercial District Plan goals is “to preserve and enhance the residential character of the neighborhood around the commercial districts” (p.9). With respect to Edgewood specifically, the Plan states that “Edgewood . . . is an important presence on Monroe Street. . . . [It] will be critical for any future plan to carefully coordinate with surrounding neighborhood and land uses to avoid any negative impacts” (p.43).

Moreover, to the extent that a Conditional Use Permit may be required, such a major amendment could not be approved under sec. 28.183(6)(a)3., MGO, because the “uses, values and enjoyment of other property in the neighborhood for purposes already established” will “be substantially impaired or diminished” in a very foreseeable manner. Even if not directly applicable, this standard provides helpful guidance as to what is in the public interest as related to substantial alterations of a CI zoning district Master Plan.

When Edgewood’s request to amend its Campus Master Plan in order to build this stadium comes before the Plan Commission, we will be asking the commission to hold Edgewood to current standards (both those we have referenced and others), reject the request, and protect the adjacent residential neighborhoods.

As stated in the city’s Comprehensive Plan, “Neighborhoods are the basic building block of the city“ (p. 46). We have provided this early communication to let you know how strongly we feel about this, and how committed we are to protecting the quality of life of our community.

 Sincerely,

 Signed:

1.     Catherine Jagoe, 2318 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

2.     Edwin Sibert, 2318 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

3.     Barbara Erlenborn, 2316 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

4.     James Erlenborn, 2316 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI  53711

5.     Rachel Lander, 2010 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

6.     Gail Martinelli, 2317 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

7.     Scott Spoolman, 2317 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

8.     Alida Evans, 2313 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

9.     Joseph Newman, 2313 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

10.  Karen Redfield, 2322 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

11.  Asifa Quraishi-Landes, 2322 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

12.  Matthew Quraishi-Landes, 2322 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

13.  Sandy Stark, 2720 Gregory St, Madison, WI 53711

14.  Robert Fischer, 702 Leonard St, Madison, WI 53711

15.  Susanna Fischer, 702 Leonard St, Madison, WI 53711

16.  Lynn Bjorkman, 1910 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

17.  Arne Alanen, 1910 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

18.  Tracy Lewis, 706 Leonard St, Madison, WI 53711

19.  Susan Nicol, 1901 Commonwealth Ave, Madison, WI 53726

20.  John Nicol, 1901 Commonwealth Ave, Madison, WI 53726

21.  Kathleen Vogel, 638 Sheldon St, Madison, WI 53711

22.  Tamara Bryan, 2254 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

23.  John Chosy, 2254 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

24.  Dan Julie, 2257 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

25.  Colleen Howes, 2257 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

26.  Lyle Laufenburg, 2262 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

27.  Linda Laufenberg, 2262 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

28.  Steve Sadoff, 2256 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

29.  Lisa Burdulis, 2256 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

30.  Melissa Vaughan, 2245 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

31.  Lissa Koop, 2236 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

32.  Dianne Jenkins, 2125 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

33.  Denis Collins, 2125 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

34.  Linda McQuillen, 2107 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

35.  Jane Albert, 2144 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

36.  Carolyn Hogg, 2145 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

37.  David Abbott, 2309 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

38.  Angela Abbott, 2309 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

39.  Jenny Saffran, 1912 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

40.  Seth Pollak, 1912 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

41.  Allison Malacek, 2320 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

42.  Adam Malacek, 2320 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

43.  Shawn Schey, 878 Woodrow St, Madison, WI 53711

44.  James Schey, 878 Woodrow St, Madison, WI 53711

45.  Rebecca Upham, 2259 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

46.  Lynn Keller, 2005 Jefferson St, Madison, WI 5371

47.  Bruce Collick, 708 Leonard St, Madison, WI 53711

48.  Patricia Alea, 708 Leonard St, Madison, WI 53711

49.  Elliott Veith, 708 Leonard St, Madison, WI 53711

50.  Joan Nugent, 1521 Vilas Ave, Madison, WI 53711

51.  Dan Anderson, 1521 Vilas Ave, Madison, WI 53711

52.  Amanda Veith, 2241 Hollister Ave, Madison WI 53726

53.  George Savage, 2443 Commonwealth Ave, Madison, WI 53711

54.  Donna Silver, 2443 Commonwealth Ave, Madison, WI 53711

55.  Catherine J. Gloeckler, 2317 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

56.  Shirley M. Dumas, 2317 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

57.  Dustie L Held, 2301 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

58.  Jeff S. Held, 2301 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

59.  Steve Klaven, 2339 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

60.  Merija Eisen, 2339 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

61.  Tag Evers, 2329 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

62.  Paul Buhle, 2341 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

63.  Mari Jo Buhle, 2341 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

64.  Jackie Domini Rose, 2372 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

65.  Jamie Domini, 2372 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

66.  Sally Jerney, 2372 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

67.  Menzie Chinn, 2325 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

68.  Laura Schwendinger, 2325 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

69.  Jeff Vanderwood, 2352 Commonwealth Ave, Madison, WI 53711

70.  Sheila Vanderwood, 2352 Commonwealth Ave, Madison, WI 53711

71.  Ben Yahr, 2332 Fitchburg Rd, Fitchburg, WI 53593 (Chairman of the Board of Directors, Friends of Lake Wingra)

72.  Marie Trest, 2310 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

73.  Dennis Trest, 2310 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

74.  Alta A. Johnson, 2264 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

75.  Timothy D. Johnson, 2264 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

76.  Pam Cramer, 2318 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

77.  Ron Cramer, 2318 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

78.  Jacob Notbohm, 2314 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

79.  Nicole Broekema, 2314 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

80.  Mary Lou Nord, 2332 Monroe St, Madison WI 53711

81.  Jessica Weeks, 2234 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

82.  John Wolf, 1921 Madison St, Madison WI 

83.  Susan Wolf, 1921 Madison St, Madison WI 

84.  Lyschel Bersch, 413 Grand Ave, Madison WI 53705

85.  Gretchen Twietmeyer, 2260 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

86.  Jim Wear, 2254 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

87.  Ziva Wear, 2254 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

88.  Mary Erdman, 638 Sheldon St, Madison WI 53711

89.  Donna Wilson, 638 Sheldon St, Madison WI 53711

90.  Scott Wilson, 613 Sheldon St, Madison WI 53711

91.  Jeff Mandell, 2148 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

92.  Sara Rostolder Mandell, 2148 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

93.  James Rosebery, 2220 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

94.  Susan O’Leary, 2220 West Lawn Ave, Madison WI 53711

95.  Patricia Wafer, 734 Western Ave, Madison WI 53711

96.  James Lake, 738 Western Ave, Madison WI 53711

97.  Ruth Robarts, 3726 Gregory St, Madison, WI 53711

98.  Fred Schrank, 2313 Keyes Ave, Madison, WI 53711

99.  Ritesh  Rihani, 2242 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

100. Mary Rihani, 2242 West Lawn, Madison, WI 53711

101. Brad Boyce, 938 Woodrow St, Madison, WI 53711

102.  Claire Boyce, 938 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

103. Dave Leeper, 866 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

104. Debi Leeper, 866 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

105. John Hauser, 865 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

106. Jennifer Kushner, 865 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

107. Dennis Kienbaum, 858 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

108. Beth Kienbaum, 858 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

109.  Mary Jones, 4846 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

110. Bill Barker, 830 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

111. Susan Paskewitz, 830 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

112. Tricia Smith, 850 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

113. Mike Smith, 850 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

114. Karl Knauf, 833 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

115. Phil McClarey, 857 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

116. Angel McClarey, 857 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

117.  Susan Nuttall, 821 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711 

118. Lynn Paskewitz, 826 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

119. Paul Guilbault, 877 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

120. Pam Guilbault, 877 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

121. Ann Recob, 885 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

122.  Craig Recob, 885 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

123.  Karen Fennema, 873 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

124. Bruce King, 873 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

125. Mark Powell, 881 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

126. Karen Powell, 881 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

127. Dan Klabund, 841 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

128.  Mary Ann Feutz, 841 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

129. Carol Sander, 838 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

130. David Vanderti, 838 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

131. Ann Rifenberg, 834 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

132.  Barb Zahn, 834 Terry Place, Madison, WI 53711

133. Char Thompson, 2716 Gregory Street, Madison, WI 53711

134. Ann Clark, 2525 Gregory Street, Madison, WI 53711

135. Allen Clark, 2525 Gregory Street, Madison, WI 53711

136. Rebecca Cole, 2824 Gregory Street, Madison, WI 53711

137.  Jim Lake, 738 Western Ave, Madison, WI 53711

138. Susan Slapnick, 1723 Summit Ave, Madison, WI 53711

139. Patricia Chevis, 2914 Arbor Drive, Madison, WI 53711

140. Summer Jarosky, 2033 Frazer Place, Madison, WI 53715

141. Joel Jarosky, 2033 Frazer Place, Madison, WI 53715

142. Tyler Leeper, 822 West Shore Drive, Madison, WI 53715

143. Kate Holt, 822 West Shore Drive, Madison, WI 53715

144.  Linda Gordon, 2121 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

145. Allen Hunter, 2121 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

146.  Marcia Standiford, 2122 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

147.  Ken Ferencek, 2122 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

148. Susan Gevelber, 2138 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

149. John Kalfayan, 2343 West Lawn Ave, Madison, WI 53711

150.  Mike Kanel, 2824 Gregory St, Madison, WI 53711

151.  Steve Glass, 1306 Seminole Highway, Madison, WI 53711

152. Yael Gen, 860 Woodrow St., Madison, WI 53711

153.  Jeffrey Jerred, 860 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

154.  Teresa Nyholt, 812 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

155.  Bob Meyer, 812 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

156. Marc Gartler, 820 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

157.  Christine Gartler, 820 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

158.  David Zimmerman, 2138 West Lawn, Madison, WI  53711

159. Ethan Brodsky, 866 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

160. Scott Statz, 810 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

161.  Sue Statz, 810 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

162.  Kay Gabriel, 826 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

163. Fiona McTavish, 826 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

164.  Josephine Harter, 2129 Keyes Ave., Madison, WI  53711

165. Simone Schweber, 2139 West Lawn, Madison, WI  53711

166.  Charles Vetzner, 30 Virginia Terrace, Madison, WI  53726

167. Arleen Wolek, 30 Virginia Terrace, Madison, WI  53726

168. Mary V. Bowman, 5 Wintergreen Trail, Madison, WI  53717

169. Rosemary Dorney, 4205 Odana Rd, Madison, WI  53711

170. Andrew Cusick, 836 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

171. Laura Oflanagan, 862 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

172.  Paul Oflanagan, 862 Woodrow St., Madison, WI  53711

173. Jeff Vanderwood, 2352 Commonwealth Ave., Madison, WI  53711

174.  Sheila Vanderwood, 2352 Commonwealth Ave., Madison, WI  53711